Don Cherry

source: CBC.ca

Canadian icon Don Cherry was born on this day in 1934.  After life as a professional Hockey Player and Coach, Cherry turned to Broadcasting, where he achieved his greatest fame.  He is one of the most controversial figures in Canada, criticized by some, loved by others.  But either way, for decades Cherry has been “must-watch TV” for millions of Canadians. He is a passionate Canadian patriot and commentator on the game of hockey. He was voted to seventh place in the CBC production of The Greatest Canadian in 2004.

Danny Gallivan

Danny Gallivan was born on this day in 1917.  He was the greatest hockey play-by-play broadcaster in history and a master of the English language.  Danny Gallivan was the voice of the Canadiens through the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Whether you were a fan of the Montreal Canadiens or not, for those over 40 you cannot help but smile when you hear clips from his calls featuring such greats as Guy Lafleur, Serge Savard and Yvon Cornoyer.   Hockey fans who are under 40 should take any opportunity to take in some old audio or video clips featuring Danny and some of his classic “Gallivanisms.” The “Savardian Spin-o-rama,” “cannonading shots” and making saves in “rapier like fashion” are just a few. When Mr. Gallivan died in 1993 the hockey world lost one of the all time greats.

The Goal

For those born in last few decades, the greatest goal in hockey that they ever witnessed was the “Golden Goal” of Sydney Crosby, the overtime goal which captured the Gold Medal for Canada at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

For others, sandwiched between the baby boomers and the millennials, the greatest goal ever scored, that they saw, came in 1987, as Wayne Gretzky passed the puck to Mario Lemieux, who scored to give Canada a 6-5 victory over the Soviet Union in the third and deciding game of the Canada Cup.

The case can be made for other great goals as well. However, hockey fans in their 50’s or older were witnesses to “The Goal,”  what most hockey observers, experts and fans alike, consider to be the greatest goal in hockey history.

In 1972 the Summit Series featured the stars of the NHL, Team Canada, against the Soviet Union. The series was about more than just hockey.  It was the height of the cold war, and for many people, this was an extension of that conflict between Soviets, representing communism and totalitarianism, and the democratic, capitalist, “free” countries of the “West.”

1972 was the first time that the best players in professional hockey would be assembled to take on the Soviets, the powerhouse that had dominated international and Olympic hockey since the 1950’s.  Canadians were confident that this time it would be different, as hockey was our game, and now we finally had a chance to prove it, “best on best.”  For the first time we would send our best players, our NHL stars, to teach the Soviets about hockey.

It didn’t start out that way.  The Canadian stars were used to using September to get in shape for the NHL season. They weren’t ready to play and it showed, as Canada only won one game out of the first four games at home, and then dropped the first game in Russia. Down 3 games to 1, with one tie, the Canadians needed to win the final three games in Russia to win the series.  They would win the next two to even the series and make the 8th and final game the decider.

What had already been a dramatic series was about to achieve legendary status. Down by two goals going into the 3rd period, Canada clawed their way back to tie the game with about 7 minutes left.  In the final minute, Paul Henderson scored to give Canada the lead and the victory in the series.

Canadians had been watching on their television sets, all over the country and around the world.  Many Canadians can still tell you where they were when Henderson scored “The Goal.”

Find out more:

The Goal:

 

 

Danny Gallivan

Danny Gallivan was born on this day in 1917.  He was the greatest hockey play-by-play broadcaster in history and a master of the English language.  Danny Gallivan was the voice of the Canadiens through the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Whether you were a fan of the Montreal Canadiens or not, for those over 40 you cannot help but smile when you hear clips from his calls featuring such greats as Guy Lafleur, Serge Savard and Yvon Cornoyer.   Hockey fans who are under 40 should take any opportunity to take in some old audio or video clips featuring Danny and some of his classic “Gallivanisms.” The “Savardian Spin-o-rama,” “cannonading shots” and making saves in “rapier like fashion” are just a few. When Mr. Gallivan died in 1993 the hockey world lost one of the all time greats.

Don Cherry

source: CBC.ca

Canadian icon Don Cherry was born on this day in 1934.  After life as a professional Hockey Player and Coach, Cherry turned to Broadcasting, where he achieved his greatest fame.  He is one of the most controversial figures in Canada, criticized by some, loved by others.  But either way, for decades Cherry has been “must-watch TV” for millions of Canadians. He is a passionate Canadian patriot and commentator on the game of hockey. He was voted to seventh place in the CBC production of The Greatest Canadian in 2004.

The Goal

For those born in last few decades, the greatest goal in hockey that they ever witnessed was the “Golden Goal” of Sydney Crosby, the overtime goal which captured the Gold Medal for Canada at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

For others, sandwiched between the baby boomers and the millennials, the greatest goal ever scored, that they saw, came in 1987, as Wayne Gretzky passed the puck to Mario Lemieux, who scored to give Canada a 6-5 victory over the Soviet Union in the third and deciding game of the Canada Cup.

The case can be made for other great goals as well. However, hockey fans in their 50’s or older were witnesses to “The Goal,”  what most hockey observers, experts and fans alike, consider to be the greatest goal in hockey history.

In 1972 the Summit Series featured the stars of the NHL, Team Canada, against the Soviet Union. The series was about more than just hockey.  It was the height of the cold war, and for many people, this was an extension of that conflict between Soviets, representing communism and totalitarianism, and the democratic, capitalist, “free” countries of the “West.”

1972 was the first time that the best players in professional hockey would be assembled to take on the Soviets, the powerhouse that had dominated international and Olympic hockey since the 1950’s.  Canadians were confident that this time it would be different, as hockey was our game, and now we finally had a chance to prove it, “best on best.”  For the first time we would send our best players, our NHL stars, to teach the Soviets about hockey.

It didn’t start out that way.  The Canadian stars were used to using September to get in shape for the NHL season. They weren’t ready to play and it showed, as Canada only won one game out of the first four games at home, and then dropped the first game in Russia. Down 3 games to 1, with one tie, the Canadians needed to win the final three games in Russia to win the series.  They would win the next two to even the series and make the 8th and final game the decider.

What had already been a dramatic series was about to achieve legendary status. Down by two goals going into the 3rd period, Canada clawed their way back to tie the game with about 7 minutes left.  In the final minute, Paul Henderson scored to give Canada the lead and the victory in the series.

Canadians had been watching on their television sets, all over the country and around the world.  Many Canadians can still tell you where they were when Henderson scored “The Goal.”

Find out more:

The Goal:

 

 

Olympic Hockey

goldToday the Canada’s Men’s Hockey Team begins its quest to repeat as Gold Medal Champions at the Olympics. Four years ago in Vancouver the Canadian team capped off an amazing Winter Olympics with a thrilling overtime victory over the USA in the Gold Medal Game.  The Canadian Women were equal to the men, once again bringing home the Gold in dominant fashion.  What will happen this time around with the Canadian Men’s and Women’s hockey teams?


home winning2010