John A. MacDonald

johnaCanada’s first Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald, was born on this day in 1815.

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Remembrance Day

source: wikimedia commons / Creative Commons

At Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary today we have our annual assemblies to observe Remembrance Day. We honour the memory of those Canadians who have fallen in war.  We do not celebrate or glorify war, but we pay respect to those that have paid the terrible costs of war.

This coming weekend will be a long weekend for students, a chance for rest and recreation. However, it is important to remember that Remembrance Day is not one of the those holidays that is just an excuse for a long weekend. Please take some time over these next few days to reflect on what Remembrance Day is all about. And on the 11th, plan to take some time to honour those that have died and those that have served. Whether you attend a ceremony in person, or check out the television coverage of the ceremony in Ottawa, take some time for Remembrance.

Persons Day

“The  historic decision to include women in the legal definition of “persons” was handed  down by Canada’s highest court of appeal – the Judicial Committee of the Privy  Council of Great Britain – on October 18, 1929. This gave women the right to be  appointed to the Senate of Canada and paved the way for women’s increased  participation in public and political life.” (From Status of Women Canada: Persons Day.)

source: famous5ottawa.ca

It may seem incomprehensible to us that women were not considered to be “persons”, at least under a strict definition of Canadian law prior to 1929.  The “Famous Five” led the fight all the way to the highest courts of the land to include women in the legal definition of “persons.”

“The exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours. And to those who would ask why the word  “person” should include females, the obvious answer is, why should it  not?”

–Lord Sankey of the Privy Council, 1929 (source)

Today we can celebrate that victory, and the slow but steady change in Canadian society towards equality for women.  We still have a long way to go, and sadly, in much the world, women are still denied equality, a “relic of days  more barbarous than ours.” Persons Day is a chance to celebrate how far we have come, and to reflect on how far we still need to go.

Don Cherry

source: CBC.ca

Canadian icon Don Cherry was born on this day in 1934.  After life as a professional Hockey Player and Coach, Cherry turned to Broadcasting, where he achieved his greatest fame.  He is one of the most controversial figures in Canada, criticized by some, loved by others.  But either way, for decades Cherry has been “must-watch TV” for millions of Canadians. He is a passionate Canadian patriot and commentator on the game of hockey. He was voted to seventh place in the CBC production of The Greatest Canadian in 2004.

Remembrance Day

poppiesAt Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary today we have our annual assemblies to observe Remembrance Day. We honour the memory of those Canadians who have fallen in war.  We do not celebrate or glorify war, but we pay respect to those that have paid the terrible costs of war.

This coming weekend will be a long weekend for students, a chance for rest and have fun. However, it is important to remember that Remembrance Day is not one of the those holidays that is just an excuse for a long weekend. Please take some time over these next few days to reflect on what Remembrance Day is all about. And on Wednesday, plan to take some time to honour those that have died and those that have served. Whether you attend a ceremony in person, or check out the television coverage of the ceremony in Ottawa, take some time for Remembrance.

Persons Day

“The  historic decision to include women in the legal definition of “persons” was handed  down by Canada’s highest court of appeal – the Judicial Committee of the Privy  Council of Great Britain – on October 18, 1929. This gave women the right to be  appointed to the Senate of Canada and paved the way for women’s increased  participation in public and political life.” (From Status of Women Canada: Persons Day.)

source: famous5ottawa.ca

It may seem incomprehensible to us that women were not considered to be “persons”, at least under a strict definition of Canadian law prior to 1929.  The “Famous Five” led the fight all the way to the highest courts of the land to include women in the legal definition of “persons.”

“The exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours. And to those who would ask why the word  “person” should include females, the obvious answer is, why should it  not?”

–Lord Sankey of the Privy Council, 1929 (source)

Today we can celebrate that victory, and the slow but steady change in Canadian society towards equality for women.  We still have a long way to go, and sadly, in much the world, women are still denied equality, a “relic of days  more barbarous than ours.” Persons Day is a chance to celebrate how far we have come, and to reflect on how far we still need to go.

Danny Gallivan

Danny Gallivan was born on this day in 1917.  He was the greatest hockey play-by-play broadcaster in history and a master of the English language.  Danny Gallivan was the voice of the Canadiens through the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Whether you were a fan of the Montreal Canadiens or not, for those over 40 you cannot help but smile when you hear clips from his calls featuring such greats as Guy Lafleur, Serge Savard and Yvon Cornoyer.   Hockey fans who are under 40 should take any opportunity to take in some old audio or video clips featuring Danny and some of his classic “Gallivanisms.” The “Savardian Spin-o-rama,” “cannonading shots” and making saves in “rapier like fashion” are just a few. When Mr. Gallivan died in 1993 the hockey world lost one of the all time greats.

Stompin’ Tom

On this day in 2013 Canada lost one its greatest cultural icons and one of its fiercest patriots.  Stompin’ Tom Connors passed away at the age of 77.  Best known for “The Hockey Song,” Stompin’ Tom wrote songs about all things Canadian.

source: stompintom.com

Besides “The Hockey Song” which can still be heard in arenas all over Canada, some of his other wonderful country-folk songs include “Bud the Spud,”  “Sudbury Saturday Night,”  and “Moon Man Newfie.”  Tom Connors was born in 1936 in Saint John, New Brunswick.  He travelled the country from sea to sea to sea, singing his songs and celebrating Canada and Canadians.

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Persons Day

“The  historic decision to include women in the legal definition of “persons” was handed  down by Canada’s highest court of appeal – the Judicial Committee of the Privy  Council of Great Britain – on October 18, 1929. This gave women the right to be  appointed to the Senate of Canada and paved the way for women’s increased  participation in public and political life.” (From Status of Women Canada: Persons Day.)

source: famous5ottawa.ca

It may seem incomprehensible to us that women were not considered to be “persons”, at least under a strict definition of Canadian law prior to 1929.  The “Famous Five” led the fight all the way to the highest courts of the land to include women in the legal definition of “persons.”

“The exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours. And to those who would ask why the word  “person” should include females, the obvious answer is, why should it  not?”

–Lord Sankey of the Privy Council, 1929 (source)

Today we can celebrate that victory, and the slow but steady change in Canadian society towards equality for women.  We still have a long way to go, and sadly, in much the world, women are still denied equality, a “relic of days  more barbarous than ours.” Persons Day is a chance to celebrate how far we have come, and to reflect on how far we still need to go.