The Goal

For those born in last few decades, the greatest goal in hockey that they ever witnessed was the “Golden Goal” of Sydney Crosby, the overtime goal which captured the Gold Medal for Canada at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

For others, sandwiched between the baby boomers and the millennials, the greatest goal ever scored, that they saw, came in 1987, as Wayne Gretzky passed the puck to Mario Lemieux, who scored to give Canada a 6-5 victory over the Soviet Union in the third and deciding game of the Canada Cup.

The case can be made for other great goals as well. However, hockey fans in their 50’s or older were witnesses to “The Goal,”  what most hockey observers, experts and fans alike, consider to be the greatest goal in hockey history.

In 1972 the Summit Series featured the stars of the NHL, Team Canada, against the Soviet Union. The series was about more than just hockey.  It was the height of the cold war, and for many people, this was an extension of that conflict between Soviets, representing communism and totalitarianism, and the democratic, capitalist, “free” countries of the “West.”

1972 was the first time that the best players in professional hockey would be assembled to take on the Soviets, the powerhouse that had dominated international and Olympic hockey since the 1950’s.  Canadians were confident that this time it would be different, as hockey was our game, and now we finally had a chance to prove it, “best on best.”  For the first time we would send our best players, our NHL stars, to teach the Soviets about hockey.

It didn’t start out that way.  The Canadian stars were used to using September to get in shape for the NHL season. They weren’t ready to play and it showed, as Canada only won one game out of the first four games at home, and then dropped the first game in Russia. Down 3 games to 1, with one tie, the Canadians needed to win the final three games in Russia to win the series.  They would win the next two to even the series and make the 8th and final game the decider.

What had already been a dramatic series was about to achieve legendary status. Down by two goals going into the 3rd period, Canada clawed their way back to tie the game with about 7 minutes left.  In the final minute, Paul Henderson scored to give Canada the lead and the victory in the series.

Canadians had been watching on their television sets, all over the country and around the world.  Many Canadians can still tell you where they were when Henderson scored “The Goal.”

Find out more:

The Goal:

 

 

“It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”

yogiFans of baseball and the English language are celebrating the life of Yogi Berra, who passed away yesterday at the age of 90. Berra is in the Hall of Fame as one of the greatest players and managers of all time. He is also the source of:

  • “It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”
  • “It’s déjà vu all over again.”
  • “Baseball is ninety percent mental; the other half is physical.”
  • “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.”
  • “You can observe a lot by watching.”
  • “Always go to other people’s funerals; otherwise they won’t go to yours.”
  • “I really didn’t say everything I said.”

Reading Buddies

The Reading Buddies program at the Surrey Public Library is looking for volunteer reading buddies. Reading Buddies is a great volunteer opportunity where you can develop your mentorship skills. Being a “big buddy” is a rewarding experience, and counts towards CAPP hours. For more information, check out surreylibraries.ca.  You can download an application form there. You can also contact the Youth Services Librarian at the Cloverdale Library to ask questions, and to apply.

The Orientation and Training Session at the Cloverdale Library takes place on September 23, so get your application in right away!

Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary to change nickname from “Panthers” to “Kitties.”

kittiesIn a move that is sure to surprise many people in Cloverdale and around the province, the Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary sports teams will no longer be known as the Panthers.  Principal Allan Buggie and Athletic Director Brien Gemmell held a news conference to announce that the school, which has had all sorts of success in recent years in many different sports, including Basketball, Football, Rugby and Track, is rebranding itself.

“It is important that Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary reflects the community in more genuine and authentic ways,” explained Principal Buggie.  “The fact is that you cannot find a real panther anywhere in Cloverdale.  However, you can find lots of little kitties. We just thought it was a much more realistic and local nickname.”

Gemmell, the Athletic Director, elaborated on that idea.  “To be honest, many of our athletes found the Panther to be a violent and disturbing image.  Too many of our kids were just scared putting on the jersey, the idea of Panthers was so frightening to them. And for our opponents, forget it.  So many schools threatened to boycott our games because they felt that the Panther was offensive, violent and scary. Kitties are much more gentle and good-natured.”

Teams from LTS will immediately become known as the Lord Tweedsmuir Kitties.  With rugby season just underway, the Lord Tweedsmuir Kitties will compete for rugby glory this spring.

 

“Let’s Talk” Mental Health Awareness Day

Mental Health is as integral to our well being as our Physical Health. Yet too often we treat Mental Health as something about which we can’t talk openly. Thanks to people like Olympian Clara Hughes (@clarahughes_) and many others, Canadians are starting to fight against the mystery and the stigma around Mental Health. Today Canadians all across the nation are talking about Mental Health. Get in on the conversation.

For more info:

Bell Let’s Talk

Kids Help Phone (1-800-668-6868)

Canadian Mental Health Association

Essay Contest: Martin Luther King Jr.

The following Essay Contest is open to all Grade 10, 11 and 12 students, and comes to us from our neighbours to the south:

The United States Consulate General in Vancouver would like to bring to your attention an exciting opportunity for your students. In recognition of upcoming Black History Month and Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we are holding an essay contest!

The essay submission deadline is Friday, February 6th, 2015.

Please include your name, grade, school and contact information with your essay submission.

Please contact us at PAVancouver@state.gov if you have any further questions about the contest. Best of luck!

 

EssayContestMLK

 

The Goal

For those born in last few decades, the greatest goal in hockey that they ever witnessed was the “Golden Goal” of Sydney Crosby, the overtime goal which captured the Gold Medal for Canada at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

For others, sandwiched between the baby boomers and the millennials, the greatest goal ever scored, that they saw, came in 1987, as Wayne Gretzky passed the puck to Mario Lemieux, who scored to give Canada a 6-5 victory over the Soviet Union in the third and deciding game of the Canada Cup.

The case can be made for other great goals as well. However, hockey fans in their 50’s or older were witnesses to “The Goal,”  what most hockey observers, experts and fans alike, consider to be the greatest goal in hockey history.

In 1972 the Summit Series featured the stars of the NHL, Team Canada, against the Soviet Union. The series was about more than just hockey.  It was the height of the cold war, and for many people, this was an extension of that conflict between Soviets, representing communism and totalitarianism, and the democratic, capitalist, “free” countries of the “West.”

1972 was the first time that the best players in professional hockey would be assembled to take on the Soviets, the powerhouse that had dominated international and Olympic hockey since the 1950’s.  Canadians were confident that this time it would be different, as hockey was our game, and now we finally had a chance to prove it, “best on best.”  For the first time we would send our best players, our NHL stars, to teach the Soviets about hockey.

It didn’t start out that way.  The Canadian stars were used to using September to get in shape for the NHL season. They weren’t ready to play and it showed, as Canada only won one game out of the first four games at home, and then dropped the first game in Russia. Down 3 games to 1, with one tie, the Canadians needed to win the final three games in Russia to win the series.  They would win the next two to even the series and make the 8th and final game the decider.

What had already been a dramatic series was about to achieve legendary status. Down by two goals going into the 3rd period, Canada clawed their way back to tie the game with about 7 minutes left.  In the final minute, Paul Henderson scored to give Canada the lead and the victory in the series.

Canadians had been watching on their television sets, all over the country and around the world.  Many Canadians can still tell you where they were when Henderson scored “The Goal.”

Find out more:

The Goal: