Reading Buddies

The Reading Buddies program at the Surrey Public Library is looking for volunteer reading buddies. Reading Buddies is a great volunteer opportunity where you can develop your mentorship skills. Being a “big buddy” is a rewarding experience, and counts towards CAPP hours. For more information, check out surreylibraries.ca.  You can download an application form there. You can also contact the Youth Services Librarian at the Cloverdale Library to ask questions, and to apply.

The Orientation and Training Session at the Cloverdale Library takes place in March. Spots fill up fast, so get your application in right away!

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The New Curriculum

source: CC/wikimedia commons
source: CC/wikimedia commons

Teachers spent the day on Thursday, November 12, planning for the implementation of BC’s new curriculum.  BC Teachers have been busy writing the curriculum to reflect the changes that have already been going on in education, and in anticipation of the needs of students moving forward. The K-9 Curriculum goes into full effect for the 2016-2017 School Year, while the 10-12 Curriculum, currently in draft form, is slated for full implementation for the 2017-2018 School Year.

More information on the Curriculum:

 

Rugby World Cup

Have you been watching the Rugby World Cup?  The tournament heads into the Quarter-Final “knockout” stage this weekend. The Rugby World Cup is the third largest sporting event in the world (after only the Olympics and the Soccer World Cup.)  The Rugby World Cup takes place every four years and brings together the top 20 international sides to battle for global rugby supremacy. Check out our display of materials related to Rugby Union Football.

rugby1111For more about Rugby and the World Cup:

International Day of the Girl

source: UNICEF

The United Nations has declared October 11 to be the International Day of the Girl Child. The day was first celebrated in 2012, as an opportunity to recognize the rights of girls, to raise awareness about the challenges that they face around the world, and to celebrate our daughters, sisters, friends and students. Sadly, girls around the world daily face discrimination, violence and the violation of their human rights.

The theme for 2015 is:  The Power of the Adolescent Girl: Vision for 2030.

Find out more:

 

World Mental Health Day

From the World Health Organization:wmhd

“Thousands of people with mental health conditions around the world are deprived of their human rights. They are not only discriminated against, stigmatised and marginalised but are also subject to emotional and physical abuse in both mental health facilities and the community. Poor quality care due to a lack of qualified health professionals and dilapidated facilities leads to further violations.

The theme for this year’s World Mental Health Day, observed on 10 October, is “Dignity in mental health”. This year, WHO will be raising awareness of what can be done to ensure that people with mental health conditions can continue to live with dignity, through human rights oriented policy and law, training of health professionals, respect for informed consent to treatment, inclusion in decision-making processes, and public information campaigns.”

Find out more:

World Mental Health Day 2015

WHO Information Sheet

Canadian Mental Health Association

Mohandas Gandhi

source: public domain / wikimedia commons

Mohandas Gandhi was born on in this day in India in 1869. Gandhi led India to independence from the British Empire, primarily through non-violent protest and peaceful resistance. His ideas would inspire future movements from such people as Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela.

For more on the life of Gandhi, click here.

The Goal

For those born in last few decades, the greatest goal in hockey that they ever witnessed was the “Golden Goal” of Sydney Crosby, the overtime goal which captured the Gold Medal for Canada at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

For others, sandwiched between the baby boomers and the millennials, the greatest goal ever scored, that they saw, came in 1987, as Wayne Gretzky passed the puck to Mario Lemieux, who scored to give Canada a 6-5 victory over the Soviet Union in the third and deciding game of the Canada Cup.

The case can be made for other great goals as well. However, hockey fans in their 50’s or older were witnesses to “The Goal,”  what most hockey observers, experts and fans alike, consider to be the greatest goal in hockey history.

In 1972 the Summit Series featured the stars of the NHL, Team Canada, against the Soviet Union. The series was about more than just hockey.  It was the height of the cold war, and for many people, this was an extension of that conflict between Soviets, representing communism and totalitarianism, and the democratic, capitalist, “free” countries of the “West.”

1972 was the first time that the best players in professional hockey would be assembled to take on the Soviets, the powerhouse that had dominated international and Olympic hockey since the 1950’s.  Canadians were confident that this time it would be different, as hockey was our game, and now we finally had a chance to prove it, “best on best.”  For the first time we would send our best players, our NHL stars, to teach the Soviets about hockey.

It didn’t start out that way.  The Canadian stars were used to using September to get in shape for the NHL season. They weren’t ready to play and it showed, as Canada only won one game out of the first four games at home, and then dropped the first game in Russia. Down 3 games to 1, with one tie, the Canadians needed to win the final three games in Russia to win the series.  They would win the next two to even the series and make the 8th and final game the decider.

What had already been a dramatic series was about to achieve legendary status. Down by two goals going into the 3rd period, Canada clawed their way back to tie the game with about 7 minutes left.  In the final minute, Paul Henderson scored to give Canada the lead and the victory in the series.

Canadians had been watching on their television sets, all over the country and around the world.  Many Canadians can still tell you where they were when Henderson scored “The Goal.”

Find out more:

The Goal:

 

 

“It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”

yogiFans of baseball and the English language are celebrating the life of Yogi Berra, who passed away yesterday at the age of 90. Berra is in the Hall of Fame as one of the greatest players and managers of all time. He is also the source of:

  • “It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”
  • “It’s déjà vu all over again.”
  • “Baseball is ninety percent mental; the other half is physical.”
  • “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.”
  • “You can observe a lot by watching.”
  • “Always go to other people’s funerals; otherwise they won’t go to yours.”
  • “I really didn’t say everything I said.”

Reading Buddies

The Reading Buddies program at the Surrey Public Library is looking for volunteer reading buddies. Reading Buddies is a great volunteer opportunity where you can develop your mentorship skills. Being a “big buddy” is a rewarding experience, and counts towards CAPP hours. For more information, check out surreylibraries.ca.  You can download an application form there. You can also contact the Youth Services Librarian at the Cloverdale Library to ask questions, and to apply.

The Orientation and Training Session at the Cloverdale Library takes place on September 23, so get your application in right away!

Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary to change nickname from “Panthers” to “Kitties.”

kittiesIn a move that is sure to surprise many people in Cloverdale and around the province, the Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary sports teams will no longer be known as the Panthers.  Principal Allan Buggie and Athletic Director Brien Gemmell held a news conference to announce that the school, which has had all sorts of success in recent years in many different sports, including Basketball, Football, Rugby and Track, is rebranding itself.

“It is important that Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary reflects the community in more genuine and authentic ways,” explained Principal Buggie.  “The fact is that you cannot find a real panther anywhere in Cloverdale.  However, you can find lots of little kitties. We just thought it was a much more realistic and local nickname.”

Gemmell, the Athletic Director, elaborated on that idea.  “To be honest, many of our athletes found the Panther to be a violent and disturbing image.  Too many of our kids were just scared putting on the jersey, the idea of Panthers was so frightening to them. And for our opponents, forget it.  So many schools threatened to boycott our games because they felt that the Panther was offensive, violent and scary. Kitties are much more gentle and good-natured.”

Teams from LTS will immediately become known as the Lord Tweedsmuir Kitties.  With rugby season just underway, the Lord Tweedsmuir Kitties will compete for rugby glory this spring.

 

“Let’s Talk” Mental Health Awareness Day

Mental Health is as integral to our well being as our Physical Health. Yet too often we treat Mental Health as something about which we can’t talk openly. Thanks to people like Olympian Clara Hughes (@clarahughes_) and many others, Canadians are starting to fight against the mystery and the stigma around Mental Health. Today Canadians all across the nation are talking about Mental Health. Get in on the conversation.

For more info:

Bell Let’s Talk

Kids Help Phone (1-800-668-6868)

Canadian Mental Health Association